Backstage Review: Clue at Bruka Theater

“Clue” is a campy play based on the board game of the same name. As in the game, you have several characters coming together for an evening of mystery and murder. Each character has instructions that include a new identity that they must adapt. Their host (Mr. Body) has many tricks up his sleeve for the evening.

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Backstage Review: Two Across at RAT

“Two Across” is a beautiful story of two strangers brought together by chance to discover a shared passion that opens their eyes to what life could be with the right person. But anything worthwhile, this is not an easy road for these two, and both of them are quite damaged. In the 80 minutes of traveling from one end of the subway to the other, the audience witnesses a remarkable transformation as Janet (Played by Robin Soli) and Josh (Played by Dave Cherry) soften to each other.

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‘Lifespan of a Fact’ at RAT

“The Lifespan of a Fact” is part funny and part cerebrally challenging, asking the question, where do journalistic ethics and good storytelling meet, and can that blending be successful? We have a writer, a fact-checker, and an editor battling with that very question in the story. Although there is no answer in the play, there are many thought-provoking questions that will fuel the audience’s conversations for some time after watching “The Lifespan of a Fact.”
RAT’s production of “The Lifespan of a Fact” is masterfully performed by Ron Flesher, JJ Mungcal, and Wendy Feign. This ensemble cast brings the story to life with a passion for the more profound questions of ethics.

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Backstage Review: ‘The Imaginary Invalid’ By Molière at Reno Little Theater

Molière’s audience was the French aristocracy and the king himself, Louis XIV, The Sun King. Perhaps a more accurate translation of the title would be The Hypochondriac. This would work better for Molière as he unmercifully ridicules the practice of medicine and the fools who pay for it.

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The Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD Series – Wagner’s THE FLYING DUTCHMAN, March 14 at 9:55 am

Richard Wagner’s first great operatic masterpiece, Der Fliegende Holländer, is the Met’s HD offering for March. Director François Girard has attempted to resolve some of the work’s more anachronistic aspects by telling the story from the point of view of its heroine, Senta. Be that as it may, the story of a young woman who is so obsessed with a mysterious old portrait that she eventually destroys herself in order to become a part of its haunted world will probably remain a bit of a stretch for many modern opera goers. Spectacular, violently stormy video projections – especially during the (long!) overture – contribute some modernizing magic as well, but in the end this particular Met production gives us a sadly static, darkly depressing reading of some of Wagner’s most glorious music.

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